Biliary tract malformations of infancy

Published:October 11, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paed.2021.09.003

      Abstract

      Biliary malformations in children are rare, but important to recognize. Diagnostic delay compromises outcomes. Some may be diagnosed prenatally, others in the newborn period, usually with clinical presentation of jaundice, with or without abdominal pain and fever. A strong level of suspicion is needed with any patient. Abdominal ultrasound, which is widely available, is an excellent initial imaging tool. Further work up may include magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) to completely define the biliary tree. Surgical management is the primary treatment for many biliary disorders.

      Keywords

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